Where were you when you tried your first Pate?

Well, where were you? I would like to say that I was in a Parisian Bistro, drinking a class of champagne when I tried my first taste of a creamy, yet bold Pate. And my handsome dinner companion was someone named Phillipe or Francois with a sexy French accent.  I was in a city with an Old World European flair.

Yes, I mean New Orleans. New Orleans has a long-standing tie to France. The evidence is all over the city in its food, architecture, art, museums and jewelry.  Louisiana officially adopted the French Fleur de lis  or Fleur de lys as a state symbol in April of 2008.

A random house in the Marigny area in New Orleans

The timing seems very odd since the Fleur de lis  symbol is everywhere in Louisiana. It was used when Nouvelle Orleans was founded in 1717. We obviously fell in love with the symbolism that dates back to early Babylonia and Egypt. The French clearly identified with the symbol when France’s  first King, Philip the First adopted a version of the symbol.

New Orleans was certainly formed with a strong French influence. The food that I love so was influenced by  French cuisine.  Although my first liver food memory is not as fancy as, Pate and champagne.

In my childhood home, my Mom served liver and onions occasionally. I remember how unattractive it always looked while cooking. Early on, I learned to douse it in ketchup  It was an occasional item, until my Dad finally put his “foot down” and refused to eat it.  I tried that with my Mom once, but it didn’t go over so well.

As my palette improved, I enjoyed trying new foods. Pate served with French Bread was a brilliant upgrade to liver and onions. Liver or pâté is not celebrated by all. All of us, that celebrate pâté, have a certain understanding between us.

I am sharing my pâté so that “those who do enjoy, may”. My husband, is not a fan of pâté . Of course, we won’t talk about all the things that he has learned to appreciate over the years. He is standing firm on staying away from Pate. C’est la vie.

To your list, I would also strongly urge that you include a Pate served in France. It is exquisite to share a bottle of vino or Champagne over fresh Pate while traveling throughout any of the French cities. C’est si bon!

Shout out to Alexa for Juliette Greco. Greco is a perfect music companion for a Toasty French Bread, Cornichions, Pate and Champagne. If you are not familiar, shout out to your own Alexa or search the net. As I am writing, I want to book a flight to Paris and stroll on the Champs-Elysees or Latin Quarter.

Pate
Print Recipe
Creamy pate
Servings Prep Time
10-16 People 40 Minutes
Cook Time
20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
10-16 People 40 Minutes
Cook Time
20 Minutes
Pate
Print Recipe
Creamy pate
Servings Prep Time
10-16 People 40 Minutes
Cook Time
20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
10-16 People 40 Minutes
Cook Time
20 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: People
Units:
Instructions
  1. Wash livers and set aside in colander to dry
  2. In saucepan, with a knife cut a slit in link sausage and remove casing. Cook sausage in pan. Remove from heat. Drain and set aside.
  3. Remove grease from pan with a paper towel. On medium low add butter to pan and add chopped garlic
  4. Dry brush mushroom with a small mushroom brush. If this is not available, use a small kitchen brush to clean.
  5. Chop mushrooms
  6. Into saucepan, add chopped mushrooms and green onions. Stir as needed. Add in all spices
  7. The liver needs to be reduced slightly to smaller pieces to allow the flavors to mingle. This time I placed the whole livers in the saucepan. I cooked until the liver starting changing colors. With a fork and knife, I cut the liver into smaller pieces. The size is not important because you will process through a food processor . I normally cut the liver into smaller pieces before cooking. (it is messy and not my favorite part)
  8. Cook until the liver is soft and tender. Add in the sausage and stir well.
  9. Add cognac to mixture and stir well. Taste with a cracker to see if additional salt, pepper or cayenne is needed.
  10. In a food processor, process until all ingredients are smooth. This recipe makes about three cups. I like to always divide pate into two containers. This allows you to use both if needed, or freeze one for another day. Wipe containers with olive oil. Sprinkle parsley on bottom of containers. In the picture, I use a 1/2 glass loaf pan. Pour in contents and allow to cool.
  11. Once cooled place in refrigerator to become solid. I normally make this the day before and allow to sit overnight. It is probably solid within a couple of hours. Using a knife, gently run it along the edges of the container. This will help the pate to loosen from the dish. Place a piece of saran wrap on counter to invert pate.
  12. Place pate upside down on the wrap and allow to settle. If the pate wont release, use the knife to gently remove. Also, the pate may be set in a pan of warm water for a couple of minutes.
  13. Remove the glass dish. Wrap pate to be used later or plate on serving platter. I normally serve with cornichions all around the pate. C'est si bon.
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Author: Mimi

I have a love affair with food, entertaining, travel and music. This site is a vehicle for me to share my journey of food. Traveling allows exposure to all types of cooking. I have learned to cook by being hungry, curious and willing to fail. Food is another form of art and creative expression. Copyright 2016 by Mimi

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